Architectural Drafter

Prepare new technical construction plans and designs for an architect.

What does an Architectural Drafter do?

An architectural drafter, guided by an architect, uses computer-aided design (CAD) and drafting systems to create new electronically storable construction plan drawings.

After considerable research, you collect construction site reports, study building codes, and calculate weight, volume, and stress of the construction materials. You’re supervised by architects and engineers as you use computers to create the form and proportions of buildings. At the outset, the diagrams you create need the supervising architects’ approval. Laying out interiors and landscaping and representing the architect at the construction site are additional responsibilities.

Architecture or engineering programs are essential for a career in drafting. The curriculum includes mathematics, science, drawing, and design. A certificate program from the American Design Drafting Association (ADDA) is essential. Only after three years of professional experience will you be eligible to take the examination. The ADDA certification is valid only for five years. Most firms look for a candidate with an associate’s degree, but many require a bachelor’s degree in drafting technology or a related field.

Apart from technical and math skills, an architectural drafter must be creative, detail-oriented, and have good time management skills.